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Lettuce bikinis launch vegetarian campaign

1/8/2014, 4:01 p.m.
Norfolk's freezing temperatures may have broken records from 18 years ago on Tuesday, but that didn't stop PETA's "Lettuce Ladies" ...
Lettuce bikinis launch vegetarian campaign

Norfolk's freezing temperatures may have broken records from 18 years ago on Tuesday, but that didn't stop PETA's "Lettuce Ladies" from hitting the Monticello Station in bikinis made out of lettuce. They were there to distribute free veggie burgers to passersby and kick off PETA's new ad campaign on Hampton Roads' light rail, The Tide.

The ads, which feature longtime supporter Russell Simmons, are currently on display on Metro buses in Washington, D.C., and encourage anyone who is tempted to get healthy, help animals, or "go green" in 2014 to "get on board—go vegan!" The campaign, available here, will run throughout January and February.

According to PETA, they have partnered with Simmons to counter the fast-food industry's marketing to urban areas.

"I grew up in Hollis, Queens and always make it my job to never forget where I came from," said Simmons. "I am particularly saddened that in poor urban communities the cheapest, most accessible food is fast food, which is also the most likely to increase the risk of developing various diseases and illnesses."

PETA notes that "fortunately, delicious and affordable vegetarian meals such as veggie burgers are available everywhere," from supermarkets to restaurant chains.

PETA also notes that on average, vegans and vegetarians are significantly leaner than meat-eaters are, and the consumption of meat and other animal-derived products has been conclusively linked to heart disease, strokes, diabetes, cancer, and obesity. Vegan meals are also an excellent choice for people who get digestive problems from cow's milk, a condition affecting 70 percent of African Americans.